4 Ways To Make Your Booth Introvert-friendly

Trade shows are flocked by all kinds of people – all demographics – the young, the old, those who love to talk, those who don’t, anyone and everyone. But does everyone visit every booth? No, they don’t. Oddly enough, the exhibitors conveniently ignore them, unknowingly letting go of a large chunk of their audience. Take the introverts for example; when was the last time you had a booth that didn’t force them to hide behind the mask of an extrovert, or worse, make a detour and not come your way? Trade shows are flocked by all kinds of people – all demographics – the young, the old, those who love to talk, those who don’t, anyone and everyone. But does everyone visit every booth? No, they don’t. Oddly enough, the exhibitors conveniently ignore them, unknowingly letting go of a large chunk of their audience. Take the introverts for example; when was the last time you had a stand that didn’t force them to hide behind the mask of an extrovert, or worse, make a detour and not come your way?

They’ve had enough of your apathy already. It’s time you make amends. Start off by:

Giving them something to talk about

Introverts hate small talk; yes, they do enjoy a good conversation, but just don’t expect them to start one. They won’t. Not unless you provide them with a conversation starter. Think of ice-breaking activities – activities like quiz contests and games that encourage mingling – activities that ease them into the conversation. You could ask them to write on a piece of paper what they would like to talk about; as long as it takes the pressure out of networking, it’s worth it.

Respecting their choice of a smaller group

They dread large groups and have the tendency to become quiet if there are too many people around. Don’t let them go into the oblivion – think of activities where they can work in pairs or trios – the lesser the number of people, the more comfortable they would be. A roundtable discussion is also a good idea, but again, only if there aren’t too many people, not more than 10 to be precise, and if the introverts do get a chance to talk, get a moderator to oversee the discussion, because the introverts won’t interrupt – that’s just how they are.

Letting them engage at their own pace

While some people love to talk during the show, others save it for later – they are the introverts, people who would rather contribute to the conversation once the show is over. And if they were to interact there and then, they would think for a while first and then speak. Give them the time to. Instead of engaging them in real-time conversations, where they may have to walk up to a stranger in a busy conference room and talk, come up with a social media thread, where they can be a part of the conversation of their own accord. The key lies in encouraging them to participate, but setting them free!

Giving them enough time to relax Social dos can be quite a task, especially for your introvert guests – they must pause for a while – they can’t just go on and on. Don’t make them. If they feel the need to recharge, make sure there are places they can go to – they’ll come back with a bang.

Introverts are good at disguise – you may not be able to single out each of them, but you can always tweak your booth or the activities you have planned to suit their best interests, as a whole. They have a lot to offer, just give them a chance to.

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