Ways To Avoid Graphic Design Disasters At Trade Shows

Graphic Design Disasters Could Be Your Biggest Pitfall. Tread With Care At The Next Trade Show!

A picture is worth a thousand words. Don’t paint a grim one, especially when you are investing your time, money and effort in an exhibit. You want to attract the visitors and not unknowingly shoo them away. Act like it. Be wary of graphic design disasters, err on the side of caution.

The visitors shouldn’t have a hard time finding you

Your graphics should make you stand out. Camouflaging is a big no-no, and so is obscuration. You don’t want anything to get in the way of the visitors’ sightline, right? That’s because it’s imperative that they see (and understand) the message that you are trying to convey. And how do you ensure that?

By taking the following into consideration before you visualize how your stand would actually look like, once the show begins and the visitors come on over:

– The floorplan
– The entrances
– The location of the theatres/seminar halls, if any
– The stands that surround you

Once you have the information with you, work on displaying your message in such a way that it vehemently catches the visitors’ attention. Yes, booking larger stand spaces is always a good idea, but more space doesn’t necessarily save your message from concealment, height does. Take full advantage of the airspace above the stand. Although hanging impactful banners up there should serve the purpose, you can always ask your designer to help you with stand-supported high-level signs, just to be on the safe side. There you go – these long-range graphics will signpost your stand – the visitors would now find it easier to find you. Pun intended!

Be quick; the visitors won’t wait forever

3 seconds to be precise – that’s how long they’ll be there for you to make or break your impression. And the irony is that within these 3 seconds, you need to catch their attention, convey what you are trying to say, and leave a mark. Is it really possible? It very much is.

– If your graphics are not mere photos, but bits and pieces of information, they’ll be an important piece of the puzzle. The visitors often wonder what’s in it for them, and that’s exactly the question your graphics should answer.

a. Go for colorful and relevant images and choose legible fonts.

b. A concise copy always helps.

– Implement the hierarchy of graphic communication

a. You now know what the visitors want to see and understand first; prioritize it.

b. Immediately tell them who you are. As soon as they walk in. Using your logo should suffice.

c. What you do should come in second.

d. And if there’s any time or space left, play around with your USPs.

– The more the images, the better

a. Remember, you have only 3 seconds. You need to act quickly. Let images do the work

b. Does your portfolio include any famous brands? If that’s a yes, do use their logos to your advantage.

c. If the visitors recognize these brands, they’ll think highly of you, no matter if they are in direct competition with your customers or have a great deal of similarity – either way, you are in a win-win situation – if you could help your customers, you can also be great help to the visitors (hopeful prospects by now).

Brevity is good, but so is detail

When the 3-second phase is over, it’s up to you how you can make the visitors stay for a longer while – a relatively lengthy and detailed copy could come in handy here – display it on a stand. Just be sure of the placement, understand the zones of your stand, and you are good to go. Use the copy to educate the visitors, and who’s to say, it won’t help you qualify them while you are at it? The endgame is to capture their attention for a few more vital seconds so that your team has a better chance of reaching out to everyone.

It’s also advisable to involve your booth / graphic designer early on so that they develop a clear understanding of your exhibit theme and message right in the beginning, and have enough time on hands to come up with a crowd-pulling stand.

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